TITLE

Surveys show shift in corn weed spectrums

PUB. DATE
September 1995
SOURCE
Agri Marketing;Sep95, Vol. 33 Issue 8, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that changes in weed management practices have resulted in the shifting of weed spectrums in many of the Midwest's and Mid-South's corn fields. Addition of new herbicides and the adoption of conservation tillage practices as causes; Study conducted by Doane Marketing Research Inc. participated by more than 4,000 corn farmers.
ACCESSION #
9509231142

 

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