TITLE

Constantius Felicius Durantinus and the Renaissance Origins of Anti-Sallustian Criticism

AUTHOR(S)
Osmond, Patricia J.; Ulery Jr., Robert W.
PUB. DATE
January 1995
SOURCE
International Journal of the Classical Tradition;Winter95, Vol. 1 Issue 3, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In the nineteenth century Sallust's Bellum Catilinae was sharply criticized for its alleged unfairness towards Cicero and bias in favor of Caesar. This article reveals the antecedents of such charges in a little-known work of the early sixteenth century, the De coniuratione Catilinae liber, composed by the Italian humanist Costanzo Felici of Castel Durante and dedicated to Leo X. Felici's new version of Sallust's monograph was a product of the Ciceronian movement and, despite his appeals to principles of historical objectivity, the author was chiefly concerned with enhancing Cicero's role in the events of 63 B.C., promoting the cult of Ciceronian rhetoric, and celebrating the Medici pope. The subsequent diffusion of Felici's opusculum in northern Europe, as well as in Counter-Reformation Italy, also reveals the links between anti-Sallustianism and conservative ideologies.
ACCESSION #
9509212324

 

Related Articles

  • Jonson’s Catiline: A Few Unrecorded Borrowings from Felici’s Historia Coniurationis Catilinariae. Lovascio, Domenico // Notes & Queries;Jun2011, Vol. 58 Issue 2, p278 

    A literary criticism of English author Ben Jonson's play "Catiline" is presented. The author suggests that Jonson was influenced by naturalist Costanzo Felici's treatise "Historia Coniurationis Catilinariae." The author analyzes several passages from "Catiline" which he feels are taken from...

  • O INTEROGAÈšIE CICERONIANÄ‚ PRELUATÄ‚ DE SALLUSTIUS. TĂRNĂUCEANU, Claudia // Studia Universitatis Petru Maior - Philologia;2012, Issue 13, p115 

    The resemblance of the words put in the mouth of Catiline by Sallust, in De coniuratione Catilinae (XX, 9), to the first interrogation placed in the opening of Cicero's Oratio in Catilinam (I, 1) has been explained in various ways by the modern scholars. One possible interpretation is that...

  • EL CIUDADANO ROMANO EN LOS ÚLTIMOS TIEMPOS DE LA REPÚBLICA: NUEVAS REPRESENTACIONES. JESúS ROCHA, ROLANDO // Stylos;2012, Vol. 21, p163 

    In this paper we attempt to investigate about the new representations of the roman citizen which are built up in the last times, of the Republic (1st century BC), throughout different social discourse, in literature, paying specific attention on De qfficiis by M. T. Cicero and Catilinae...

  • Authoring within history: the legacy of Roman politics in Hannah Arendt. Hammer, Dean // Classical Receptions Journal;Jan2015, Vol. 7 Issue 1, p129 

    For Hannah Arendt, a twentieth-century German–American political theorist, there is probably no concept more distinctive to Roman politics, and more associated with the Roman senate, than auctoritas. In this article, I explore an ambiguity and tension that lies at the heart of auctoritas...

  • JOCASTA'S CATILINARIAN ORATION (SEN. PHOEN. 632-43). GINSBERG, LAUREN // Classical Journal;2016, Vol. 111 Issue 4, p483 

    As Seneca's Jocasta pleads with Polynices to cease his assault on his homeland and return into exile, she borrows language from Cicero's In Catilinam 1 and Sallust's Bellum Catilinae. As a result, Seneca brings the mythological world of the Phoenissae into dialogue with a moment of strife from...

  • DOLOREM IPSUM Pain Itself. Tobier, Lincoln // X-tra: Contemporary Art Quarterly;Winter2012, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p50 

    The author offers his insight on a pseudo-Latin passage called "Dolorem Ipsum." It states that the passage originated from Roman philosopher Cicero, which means "There is no one who loves pain itself, who seeks after it and wants to have it, simply because it is pain." The author also offers his...

  • Cicero Learns about Modern Law Practice. Bowman, Byrne A. // American Bar Association Journal;Sep78, Vol. 64 Issue 9, p1365 

    Presents a play which focuses on Marcus Tullius Cicero of ancient Rome's study of modern law practice. Professional and professional life of lawyers in the United States; Lawyers' interest in politics; Lawyers' fees; Time management; Profitability of practicing in fields such as tax law.

  • THE MASTER LAWYER. Baker, Rosalie F. // Calliope;Oct2008, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p32 

    The article focuses on the life and works of orator and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero and his commitment in law and politics in Rome.

  • Words of wisdom from Cicero resonate today. Langhorne, John // Corridor Business Journal;12/27/2010, Vol. 7 Issue 23, p16 

    The author shares the words of wisdom from Marcus Tullius Cicero, who was assassinated on December 7, 43 BCE, with an aim to reflect on the attributes which include the delusion that individual advancement is made by crushing others, the tendency to worry about things that cannot be changed or...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics