TITLE

Inquiring students want to know: Who tries to ban books and why?

AUTHOR(S)
Flowers, Helen F.
PUB. DATE
March 1995
SOURCE
Book Report;Mar/Apr95, Vol. 13 Issue 5, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Cites the banning of books from school libraries in the United States. Author's development of a program for Banned Books Week; Banned Books Week Resource Kit; Parents' right to decide what their children may read; Role of library media specialists in focusing attention on the freedom to read and the dangers of censorship; Examples of banned books. INSET: Materials to have close at hand when teaching about..
ACCESSION #
9503213214

 

Related Articles

  • Banning Books: Think and Write.  // Writing;Feb/Mar2001 Teacher's Edition, Vol. 23 Issue 5, p3 

    Suggests classroom strategies for presenting the topic on banning of books. Pre-reading vocabulary list; Definition of dangerous and offensive books; Difference between a challenged book and a banned book; Discussion questions; Extension activities.

  • Maryland schools ban books by Maya Angelou and Toni Morrison.  // Jet;01/26/98, Vol. 93 Issue 9, p12 

    Reports that books by black authors Maya Angelou and Toni Morrison were banned from two Maryland school superintendents after white parents claimed they were anti-white. The decision to remove the books based on the demands of the parents despite a contrary recommendation from the faculty.

  • Acting on principals.  // American Libraries;Aug96, Vol. 27 Issue 7, p14 

    Relates issues of school principals in Louisiana and Georgia removing questionable books from libraries even though no one had filed a complaint. Actions of the principal of the West Monroe, Louisiana High School; Removal of books by James Baldwin from library shelves at Baker Middle School in...

  • Court Upholds Island Trees' Board ACLU Plans Appeal in Book Ban Suit.  // School Library Journal;Sep79, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p15 

    Reports that United States District Court Judge George C. Pratt upheld the actions of the Island Trees Union School Board in New York in banning 11 books from the high school library in March 1976. Pratt's argument that the action did not sharply and directly implicate basic First Amendment...

  • Banned Book Week: Booksellers Censure Those Who Censor.  // Education Week;9/8/1982, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p2 

    The article reports on the display of banned books as a part of a nationwide effort to increase public awareness of censorship by the bookstores and libraries in the U.S.

  • Book excerpts barred by 'Congressional Record.'.  // Library Journal;8/1/1976, Vol. 101 Issue 14, p1586 

    Reports on the refusal of the Joint Committee of Printing (JCP) to publish excerpts from books confiscated and banned by New York's Island Trees school board. Support of JCP to the Island Trees school board; Authors of the barred books; Profanity and vulgarism of the books.

  • Island Trees school board lifts seven year book ban.  // Library Journal;9/15/1982, Vol. 107 Issue 16, p1694 

    Reports that the board of the Island Trees Union Free School District in New York has rescinded a book ban it ordered in March 1976. Reason why several books were removed from school libraries; Effect of the decision made by the U.S. Supreme Court regarding the censorship case on the issue;...

  • Island Trees, N.Y. Book Panel to Determine Fate of Banned Books.  // School Library Journal;May76, Vol. 22 Issue 9, p11 

    Reports on the book controversy in the Island Trees School District, Levittown, New York which involves the ordering of ten titles removed from the school library by the board of education. Elimination of one book from a senior literature course; Removal of the books on the basis of...

  • CENSORSHIP ISSUES SURFACE IN WEST VIRGINIA, OHIO, VERMONT AND NEW YORK SCHOOL SYSTEMS.  // School Library Journal;Oct74, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p60 

    Reports on lawsuits and protests concerning magazines, trade and textbooks purchased for classroom and library use in school systems in West Virginia, Ohio, Vermont and New York. Objection to the use of language in addition to what is considered objectionable and corruptive subject content.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics