TITLE

Metabolic stress among prehistoric foragers of the central Alaskan Gulf

AUTHOR(S)
Steffian, Amy F.; Simon, James J.K.
PUB. DATE
September 1994
SOURCE
Arctic Anthropology;1994, Vol. 31 Issue 2, p78
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents collected data on metabolic stress and evaluates the economic and social context of the stress based on radiographic analysis of human long bones from two Kachemak tradition sites on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Presence of Harris lines in multiple skeletal elements; Argument on the recurrent problem for Kachemak foragers.
ACCESSION #
9501101317

 

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