TITLE

Visceral obesity predicts adverse pathological features in urothelial bladder cancer patients undergoing radical cystectomy: a retrospective cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Autorino, Riccardo; Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Ferro, Matteo; De Domenico, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Damiano, Rocco
PUB. DATE
April 2014
SOURCE
World Journal of Urology;Apr2014, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p559
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: To evaluate the pathological characteristics of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) undergoing radical cystectomy (RC) for urothelial bladder cancer (BCa). Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 262 consecutive patients with muscle-invasive urothelial BCa or non-muscle-invasive urothelial BCa bacillus Calmette-Guerin refractory undergoing RC with standard pelvic lymphadenectomy. The patients were stratified into those with or without MetS, and a bivariate logistic regression analysis was done to assess MetS and, separately, each single MetS component as independent predictors of higher pathological stage as well as of the presence of lymph vascular invasion (LVI) and lymph node metastasis (LM). Results: Metabolic syndrome was found in 36.3 % of patients. At logistic regression analysis, the presence of MetS did not predict the risk of both higher pathological stage and LVI and LM. Investigating the single components of MetS after adjusting for age, gender, and smoking, the risk of higher pathological stage increased with body mass index [BMI (OR 1.307, 95 % CI 1.098-1.555)], waist circumference (OR 1.414, 95 % CI 1.364-1.668), and blood hypertension (OR 2.326, 95 % CI 1.147-4.717). Higher BMI also predicted the presence of LVI (OR 1.432, 95 % CI 1.173-1.748) and LM (OR 1.202, 95 % CI 0.951-1.519), whereas HDL cholesterol was inversely associated with the risk of LVI and LM. Conclusions: Metabolic syndrome does not represent an independent risk factor for worse pathological findings in BCa. Conversely, individual components of MetS could increase the risk of higher stage as well as LM.
ACCESSION #
95007049

 

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