TITLE

Japan: Bitcoin is not money but may be taxed

AUTHOR(S)
Nick Goodway
PUB. DATE
March 2014
SOURCE
Evening Standard;3/ 7/2014, p55
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
JAPAN has ruled that bitcoin is not legal tender but could still be the subject of taxation and anti moneylaundering rules.
ACCESSION #
94803229

 

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