TITLE

Lost in translation

AUTHOR(S)
Spence, Des
PUB. DATE
March 2014
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal;3/1/2014, Vol. 348 Issue 7947, p37
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author discusses the challenges in the communication between doctors and patients. Topics discussed include obstruction of communication by doublespeak, pompous professional jargon and coded clichés, examples of some common phrases used by doctors and what patients really hear and the real meaning behind the familiar phrases said by patients to doctors.
ACCESSION #
94744494

 

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