TITLE

Weaving Hidden Threads: Some Ethno-historical Clues on the Artistic Affinities between Eastern Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh

AUTHOR(S)
Pommaret, Françoise
PUB. DATE
March 2002
SOURCE
Tibet Journal;Spring/Summer2002, Vol. 27 Issue 1/2, p179
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses some ethno-historical clues on the artistic affinities of traditional weavers and examines ways in which weaving is related between the two areas of eastern Bhutan and the West Kameng district of Arunachal Pradesh in India. Popularity of Bhutanese women for famous textiles they weave; Similarities in weaving between these two contiguous regions; Examination of their lifestyle and economic status.
ACCESSION #
9453398

 

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