TITLE

DONKEY KONG

AUTHOR(S)
Barnes, Fred
PUB. DATE
November 1994
SOURCE
New Republic;11/14/94, Vol. 211 Issue 20, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Explores the political advertisements of Democratic Party candidates for the November 1994 elections in the U.S. Establishment of a negative campaign against Republicans; Complaints raised by African American leaders against a TV commercial showing a high school picture of political candidate J. C. Watts; Accusations made by Florida Governor Lawton Chiles against Republican Jeb Bush.
ACCESSION #
9411077518

 

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