TITLE

Orange light for peace

AUTHOR(S)
Gibson, Helen
PUB. DATE
October 1994
SOURCE
Time;10/24/1994, Vol. 144 Issue 17, p43
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Notes the announcement by Protestant paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland that they will join the Irish Republican Army in observing a cease fire. The IRA's continued adherence to its own cease-fire after 25 years of bloodshed; Obstacles still remaining; Sinn Fein.
ACCESSION #
9410187614

 

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