TITLE

Robert Parsons and equivocation, 1606-1610

AUTHOR(S)
Carrafiello, Michael L.
PUB. DATE
October 1993
SOURCE
Catholic Historical Review;Oct1993, Vol. 79 Issue 4, p671
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the importance of the Morton/Parsons exchanges of equivocation. Thomas Morton and his opinions; Robert Parsons and his opinions; Historians' opinions.
ACCESSION #
9409090100

 

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