TITLE

Chipping away at Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Coleman, Fred
PUB. DATE
July 1994
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;7/18/94, Vol. 117 Issue 3, p47
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines how US investment in semiconductor research is paying off. Global sales of semiconductor business; Fatal Japanese weakness--an inability to make midcourse corrections in their operations; Heavy investment in research and development by American chip makers; European chip makers who are following the American example; Phases the semiconductor industry has gone through.
ACCESSION #
9407127658

 

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