TITLE

Calendar

PUB. DATE
July 1994
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;7/11/94, Vol. 117 Issue 2, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments that on July 11 1994, there will be 2,000 more days until the year 2000. Although 51% of Americans believe that the nation is in decline some, like futurist Marvin Cetron, foresee an American renaissance in the coming years.
ACCESSION #
9407067501

 

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