TITLE

Classroom ecological inventory

PUB. DATE
March 1994
SOURCE
Teaching Exceptional Children;Spring94, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a classroom ecological inventory form for use in the description and discussion of salient features of the learning environment. Classroom observation; Physical environment; Teacher/student behavior; Posted classroom rules; Teacher interview; Classroom rules; Teacher behavior.
ACCESSION #
9406021627

 

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