Using cues and prompts to improve story writing

Graves, Anne; Hauge, Rochelle
June 1993
Teaching Exceptional Children;Summer93, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p38
Academic Journal
Describes the use of cues and prompts to improve children's story writing. Effects of story writing on the students' analytic skills; Recommendations for teaching students how to use a story grammar cuing system to improve both the fluency and quality of their stories; Assessment of students' knowledge of story grammar; Self monitoring checklist.


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