TITLE

A `Roe v. Wade' on suicide?

AUTHOR(S)
Shapiro, Joseph P.
PUB. DATE
May 1994
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;5/16/94, Vol. 116 Issue 19, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that US District Judge Barbara Rothstein became the first federal magistrate to rule that terminally ill people have a constitutionally guaranteed right to end their lives. Comment by Seattle attorney Kathryn Tucker, who brought the successful challenge to Washington state's ban on assisted suicide; Court case of Dr. Jack Kevorkian; How courts are proving to be a friendly venue for euthanasia supporters.
ACCESSION #
9405107521

 

Related Articles

  • The euthanasia follies.  // Commonweal;6/3/94, Vol. 121 Issue 11, p3 

    Questions the acquittal of physician-assisted suicide advocate Dr. Jack Kevorkian. Kevorkian's assistance of degenerative disease sufferer Thomas Hyde's suicide; Federal Judge Barbara Rothstein's decision over legalization of euthanasia and its declaration as a constitutionally protected right;...

  • Legal confusion about suicides. Gow, Haven Bradford // Chinatown News;7/3/94, Vol. 41 Issue 20, p29 

    Discusses two federal court rulings on physician-assisted suicides that send mixed messages to lawyers and to ordinary citizens. Reinstatement of two criminal charges against Dr. Jack Kevorkian in Michigan; Ruling in Seattle, Washington that a state law prohibiting assisted suicides is...

  • People of the State of Michigan vs. Jack Kevorkian-2/5/91.  // Current Legal Documents;1950-, p0 

    Presents the case of People of the State of Michigan vs. Jack Kevorkian. Details of the case in which the court sought to stop Kevorkian from assisting people who wished to commit suicide; Details of the trial; The court decision.

  • Kevorkian cleared again. Roberts, John // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);3/16/96, Vol. 312 Issue 7032, p656 

    Reports on the acquittal of physician Jack Kevorkian on charges of illegally assisting in the suicide of two ill patients. Lawsuit against Kevorkian in Michigan which passed a law to stop his campaign to make physician assisted suicide a legitimate practice in the United States.

  • Ethics. Greene, Jan; Serb, Chris // H&HN: Hospitals & Health Networks;04/05/97, Vol. 71 Issue 7, p24 

    Focuses on the study which indicates the health care industry's view of the terminally ill which has changed along with the public's. Jack Kevorkian's high-profile in several assisted suicide cases; Purpose of the 10-point treatment program; Human Genome Project's ambitious goal of mapping...

  • State of Michigan in the Circuit Court for the County of Oakland. Gilbert, Alice L. // Issues in Law & Medicine;Summer91, Vol. 7 Issue 1, p107 

    Presents a transcript of the opinion of the Circuit Court for the County of Oakland, State of Michigan, in the physician-assisted suicide case of `People v. Kevorkian.' Physician Jack Kevorkian's use of his created device to assist the suicide of Alzheimer's disease patient Janet Adkins;...

  • Fasting for the right to die. Nelan, Bruce W.; McBride, Michael // Time;11/15/1993, Vol. 142 Issue 20, p89 

    Reports that Jack Kevorkian, 65, was hauled into a Detroit courtroom last Friday to face charges of violating a new Michigan law which makes assisted suicide a crime. His threats to starve himself to death in his cell; Comments from his jailer, Wayne County Sheriff Robert Ficano; Kevorkian's...

  • Dr. Kevorkian on trial again. Roberts, John // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);2/24/96, Vol. 312 Issue 7029, p464 

    Reports on the prosecution of Jack Kevorkian for the second time after the state of Michigan failed to convict him in his initial trial from assisting in the suicides of two seriously ill patients in 1993. Opinion of doctors on the issue of assisted suicide according to a survey; Indications...

  • Dr. Jack Kevorkian should be prosecuted for assisted-suicide. Hanson, Cynthia; McLaughlin, Abraham // Christian Science Monitor;9/1/95, Vol. 87 Issue 195, p2 

    Reports on the ruling given by a judge on August 30, 1995 for the prosecution of Dr. Jack Kevorkian for assisted suicide of two patients.

Share

Read the Article

Other Topics