TITLE

A wayward boys' `shock incarceration' camp

AUTHOR(S)
Simons, John
PUB. DATE
May 1994
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;5/9/94, Vol. 116 Issue 18, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses America's three federally funded juvenile boot camps. Concern that the boys don't understand the link between the Environmental Youth Corps' daily rigors and their hoped-for transformation into law-abiding teenagers; Questionable lasting value of the 90 days of verbal abuse and calisthenics for miscreants from troubled neighborhoods; University of South Alabama study of Mobile's EYC camp; Backers of the juvenile camps.
ACCESSION #
9405047544

 

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