TITLE

A vanishingly small down payment

AUTHOR(S)
Hannon, Kerry
PUB. DATE
May 1994
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;5/2/94, Vol. 116 Issue 17, p69
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that in conjunction with GE Capital Mortgage Insurance Corp., some lenders backed by the Federal National Mortgage Association--the nation's largest supplier of home mortgage funds--now offers 30-year loans with 3 percent down payments rather than the usual 5% to 20%. Loan limits which vary by city; Borrowers qualifying for Federal Housing Administration-insured loans; Nothing-down program offered by Fleet Financial Group.
ACCESSION #
9404267601

 

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