TITLE

A new political order rises in Russia

AUTHOR(S)
Coleman, Fred
PUB. DATE
April 1994
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;4/4/94, Vol. 116 Issue 13, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that the struggle to succeed Boris Yeltsin, the ailing Russian president, is already underway. Health factors; New, mostly centrist political constellation that is replacing him atop Russian politics; Visible leader Prime Minister Victor Chernomyrdin; How Yeltsin's political demise would be a heavy blow to the Clinton administration.
ACCESSION #
9403297511

 

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