TITLE

Preoccupied

AUTHOR(S)
Kaplan, Lawrence F.
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;4/7/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 13, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on opposing points of view within the United States and United Nations about post-Iraqi War planning. The State Department, keen to maintain stability in Iraq--and largely indifferent to building democracy there--also hopes for a U.N.-centric postwar plan. Secretary of State Colin Powell and U.N. Ambassador John Negroponte, along with officials from the State Department's Bureau of Near East Affairs (NEA) are pushing for a U.N. resolution that would eventually hand over Iraq's postwar administration to the world body. Just as he did before the war, Great Britain's Tony Blair has cast his lot with Powell and pressed President George W. Bush to return to the U.N. Security Council. Far from alarming the Bush team's Euro-phobes, France's reluctance to endorse the postwar vision of Blair and the State Department pleases no one so much as the hawks at the Pentagon, in the National Security Council, and in the vice president's office, as well as more than a few members of Iraq's exile community. To this end, the administration's postwar plans draw some fairly sharp distinctions--between Iraq's security, which it aims to maintain via the U.S. military; Iraq's political arena, where the United States quickly hopes to empower Iraqis themselves; and the task of humanitarian aid and reconstruction, which Washington hopes to accomplish through a combination of Iraqi oil revenues, nongovernmental organizations, U.S. aid, and the United Nations.
ACCESSION #
9397459

 

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