TITLE

Home Front

AUTHOR(S)
Chait, Jonathan
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;4/7/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 13, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the decision of the administration of United States President George W. Bush to delay its proposed budget, which made no provision at all for war with Iraq. At first, the White House defended this omission by asserting that war might not happen at all, despite its massive military buildup in the Persian Gulf region and its continued threats of war. The suspicion all along was that the administration was delaying its war estimate until after Congress acceded to its proposed tax cuts. When a reporter asked White House Press Secretary Ari Fleischer if Bush was postponing his request for war funding until Congress approved his budget, Fleischer replied, "No." Then, that very afternoon, the Senate voted down an amendment to halve the tax cut, apparently paving the way for Bush's plan. For months, there has been a widespread assumption in Washington that, once the war with Iraq is successfully completed, Republicans will use the patriotic afterglow to push through the most controversial elements of Bush's domestic agenda. Let us suppose that there are a greater number of debate-averse, emotionally delicate, news-junkie troops on the front line than one might expect. Surely, the best way to avoid upsetting them is not to ram through a controversial tax cut on a party-line vote, as the White House has sought to do, but instead to postpone the debate until after the war. Of course, that would raise a frightening prospect: debating the tax cut on its own merits.
ACCESSION #
9397453

 

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