TITLE

LEACHING OF HEAVY METALS FROM SOILS STABILIZED WITH PORTLAND CEMENT AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION BOTTOM ASH

AUTHOR(S)
Burlakovs, Juris; Arina, Dace; Rudovica, Vita; Klavins, Maris
PUB. DATE
July 2013
SOURCE
Research for Rural Development - International Scientific Confer;2013, Vol. 2, p101
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Heavy metals are worldwide spread pollutants in soils of functioning as well as abandoned industrial territories, landfills, military areas with its historical contamination, and other sites contaminated by industrial activities. Development of soil and groundwater remediation technologies is a matter of great importance to diminish the hazardous impact of pollution to humans and environment. Sustainable solution can be found for remediation of industrial areas using the stabilization / solidification (S/S) technology, which refers to binding of waste contaminants to a more chemically stable form. Geotechnical properties of soil treated with Portland cement (PC) can be improved when municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) ash is used as the combined additive. Ash is composed mainly of metals, so environmental impact must be evaluated if it is used as amendment in the cement industry. The use of MSWI ash in stabilization of contaminated soils would be useful for the sustainable environmental management in two ways: S/S contaminated soil gains better geotechnical stability and waste incineration industry gets rid of the ash with high metal content. The aim of research is to provide pilot batch experimental results for leaching of heavy metal compounds when S/S technology is used for contaminated soils using PC and MSWI bottom ash additives. Mineral soils were spiked with copper, PC and MSWI were added in known proportions and leaching tests applied. Main results show that PC addition allows to chemically stabilize soil; thus, heavy metals are not leached out from combined mass of spiked soil and MSWI bottom ash.
ACCESSION #
93641004

 

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