TITLE

Improving Your Diet Prolongs Life After Heart Attack

PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter;Jan2014, Vol. 31 Issue 11, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on a study which examines the dietary changes of people who experienced heart attack and their impact on overall wellness. Findings reveal that patients who turned into healthy diet were 40% less likely to die from cardiovascular diseases and 29% less likely to die from any cause. Also indicated are the most common diet changes which include lowering trans fats, consuming less red and processed meats, and eating whole grains.
ACCESSION #
93454171

 

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