TITLE

Law and Morality at War

AUTHOR(S)
Haque, Adil
PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
Criminal Law & Philosophy;Jan2014, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p79
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Through a critical engagement with Jeremy Waldron's work, as well as the work of other writers, I offer an account of the relative scope of the morality of war, the laws of war, and war crimes. I propose an instrumentalist account of the laws of war, according to which the laws of war should help soldiers conform to the morality of war. The instrumentalist account supports Waldron's conclusion that the laws of war justifiably prohibit attacks on civilians even if it turns out that some civilians lack a moral right not to be killed. Importantly, the instrumentalist account also offers what Waldron thinks impossible: a non-consequentialist defense of the failure of the laws of war to prohibit the killing of nonthreatening combatants. Finally, I argue that new war crimes can be broader than the morality of war as well as established laws of war and that many of the arguments for defining war crimes more narrowly than either the morality of war or the laws of war are unconvincing. In all of these ways, I hope to carry forward Waldron's project of exploring the relationship between law and morality in war.
ACCESSION #
93447640

 

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