TITLE

Neurolaw and Direct Brain Interventions

AUTHOR(S)
A Vincent, Nicole
PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
Criminal Law & Philosophy;Jan2014, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p43
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This issue of Criminal Law and Philosophy contains three papers on a topic of increasing importance within the field of 'neurolaw'-namely, the implications for criminal law of direct brain intervention based mind altering techniques (DBI's). To locate these papers' topic within a broader context, I begin with an overview of some prominent topics in the field of neurolaw, where possible providing some references to relevant literature. The specific questions asked by the three authors, as well as their answers and central claims, are then sketched out, and I end with a brief comment to explain why this particular topic can be expected to gain more prominence in coming years.
ACCESSION #
93447633

 

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