TITLE

The slow-aging growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene-disrupted (GHR-KO) mouse is protected from aging-resultant neuromusculoskeletal frailty

AUTHOR(S)
Arum, Oge; Rickman, Dustin; Kopchick, John; Bartke, Andrzej
PUB. DATE
February 2014
SOURCE
Age;Feb2014, Vol. 36 Issue 1, p117
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Neuromusculoskeletal (physical) frailty is an aging-attributable biomedical issue of extremely high import, from both public health and individual perspectives. Yet, it is rarely studied in nonhuman research subjects and very rarely studied in animals with extended longevity. In an effort to address this relatively neglected area, we have conducted a longitudinal investigation of the neuromusculoskeletal healthspan in mice with two senescence-slowing interventions: growth hormone (GH) resistance, produced by GH receptor 'knockout' (GHR-KO), and caloric restriction (CR). We report marked improvements in the retention of strength, balance, and motor coordination by the longevity-conferring GHR/BP gene disruption, CR regimen, or a combination of the two. Specifically, GHR-KO mice exhibit superior grip strength, balance, and motor coordination at middle age, and CR mice display superior grip strength at middle age. The advantageous effects established by middle-age are more pronounced in old-age, and these robust alterations are, generally, not gender-specific. Thus, we show that genetic and/or dietary interventions that engender longevity are also beneficial for the retention of neuromusculoskeletal health and functionality. The translational knowledge to be gained from subsequent molecular or histological investigations of these models of preserved functionality and decelerated senescence is potentially relevant to the efforts to reduce the specter of fear, falls, fracture, and frailty in the elderly.
ACCESSION #
93447561

 

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