TITLE

Barriers to women clinician-scientists: a trainee's perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Kalia, Lorraine V.
PUB. DATE
February 2003
SOURCE
Clinical & Investigative Medicine;Feb2003, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses issues concerning the underrepresentation of women among Canadian clinician-scientists. Statistics on medical doctor/doctor of philosophy degree programs; Views of women students on such programs; Implications to female trainees.
ACCESSION #
9321814

 

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