TITLE

Description of a not-so-novel, X-linked syndrome

AUTHOR(S)
Silverman, Melvin
PUB. DATE
February 2003
SOURCE
Clinical & Investigative Medicine;Feb2003, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduces a series of articles on issues facing women clinician-scientists from the February 1, 2003 issue of 'Clinical and Investigative Medicine.'
ACCESSION #
9321808

 

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