TITLE

Dear Eduard

AUTHOR(S)
Cohen, Gary
PUB. DATE
October 1993
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;10/11/93, Vol. 115 Issue 14, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
States that while he was hiding in the embattled city of Sukhumi, Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze appealed to his Russian neighbors to help stop the fighting between Georgia and Abkhazian rebels. In response, what he received was a none-too-subtle letter from Boris Yeltsin, in which the Russian president expressed his hope that Shevardnadze would help him lobby the West to revise the 1990 treaty governing conventional forces in Europe.
ACCESSION #
9310057620

 

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