TITLE

Everybody's miracle drug

AUTHOR(S)
Brink, Susan
PUB. DATE
September 1993
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;9/13/93, Vol. 115 Issue 10, p77
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a conversation with pharmacologist and consumer advocate Joe Graedon, co-author of the book, `The Aspirin Handbook.' He discusses surprising new uses for ordinary aspirin, low-dose aspirin therapy, aspirin and ulcers, aspirin's interaction with other drugs, and more.
ACCESSION #
9309100017

 

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