TITLE

When cities give up their streets

AUTHOR(S)
Leo, John
PUB. DATE
July 1993
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;7/26/93, Vol. 115 Issue 4, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Contends that the specter of the New York City Fire Department backing off from kids who open fire hydrants, and then refuse to allow the firefighters to close them again, is a policy that is as demoralizing as major crimes. Cities haunted by fear that no one is really in charge; Menaces are adjusted to, instead of being confronted, and become part of the system; Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly called for a new level of intolerance in New York; Example of Roslyn High School, Long Island.
ACCESSION #
9307200223

 

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