Evaluating the Slim-Fast diet plan for teens

Brown, Debra K.
March 1993
Obesity & Health;Mar/Apr93, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p28
Explains why the author, a registered dietitian and professional health care provider, vehemently opposes the Slim-Fast plan as a dieting method for teenagers. How the diet consists of a very low calorie regime which can range from 800 to 1,200 calories daily; How a diet composed of processed foods is unhealthy for anyone at any age; Why children and adolescents need to learn there is no `quick fix' for losing weight; Results from the National Adolescent Health Survey; More.


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