TITLE

Secrets of the cold war

AUTHOR(S)
Stanglin, Douglas; Headden, Susan
PUB. DATE
March 1993
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;3/15/93, Vol. 114 Issue 10, p30
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Documents a global spy campaign no one has ever told about--including families of the men who fought the Cold War. American violation of Soviet airspace with the pilot Francis Gary Powers spy flight; The enormous scope of the espionage campaign; Risks were high; Analysis of the whereabouts of those Americans declared `missing'; Obstructionism; Coverup concerning those missing. INSETS: The man who kept the files (Sam Klaus), by Susan Headden.;About this report..
ACCESSION #
9303110192

 

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