TITLE

PUBLIC WORKS WON'T WORK

AUTHOR(S)
Reynolds, Alan
PUB. DATE
March 1993
SOURCE
National Review;3/15/1993, Vol. 45 Issue 5, p50
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article contends that U.S. President Bill Clinton's plan to increase infrastructure spending will not improve economic growth. This plan is supported by economist David Aschauer of Bates College. According to Aschauer, through government investments in infrastructure, private sectors experienced an increase in productivity. However, many disclaim the idea that infrastructure spending will speed up economic growth. Many believe that government investment could impact private productivity, and the usual explanation is that well-maintained highways reduce transportation time.
ACCESSION #
9303040068

 

Related Articles

  • A Two-Track Growth Program. Galbraith, James K. // Challenge (05775132);Jan/Feb93, Vol. 36 Issue 1, p4 

    This article presents a two-track program that could combine fiscal stimulus in the first two years of the administration of U.S. President Clinton with deficit reduction effective at a later date. The early months of 1993 present unique opportunities and challenges in two other respects. First,...

  • Bull Market. Reynolds, Alan // National Review;3/9/1998, Vol. 50 Issue 4, p44 

    This article asserts that the U.S. economic performance has been far less impressive than many have contended. The administration of U.S. President Bill Clinton have asserted that the President's economic strategy is working for U.S. families. For proof, the administration prides itself of the...

  • SHUT UP AND SMILE.  // New Republic;11/03/97, Vol. 217 Issue 18, p9 

    Applauds the efforts of the administration of U.S. President Bill Clinton to improve the economic conditions of the country in 1997. Drop in crime rates in several states including California; Decline in inflation and unemployment rate; Improvement in the tax revenues for both the state and...

  • On the Economy. Thredgold, Jeff // Enterprise/Salt Lake City;09/18/2000, Vol. 30 Issue 11, p25 

    Comments on the state of economy in the United States. Slowdown of economic growth; Increase in productivity of workers; Low unemployment rate; Impact of high oil prices on consumer inflation.

  • Economics 201. Robinson III, James D. // International Economy;Jul/Aug2001, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p29 

    Highlights the lessons that can be learned from a long period of economic expansion, high employment and inflation-less growth in the United States, by the administration of President George W. Bush. Role of global trade and technology-enhanced competition on keeping pricing power by business...

  • The day the red ink started to vanish. Kiefer, Francine // Christian Science Monitor;1/17/2001, Vol. 93 Issue 36, p1 

    Discusses the effect of the decisions of United States president Bill Clinton on the United States economy.

  • CLINTON'S DISMAL SCIENTISTS. Moore, Stephen // National Review;3/15/1993, Vol. 45 Issue 5, p32 

    The article traces the track record of the economists who served Democratic leaders in the U.S. and is serving U.S. President Bill Clinton as of March 1993. In 1978, the country is faced with double-digit inflation and declining real incomes. In response to this crisis, Democrats proposed an...

  • Method Acting. Judis, John B. // New Republic;01/22/2001, Vol. 224 Issue 4, p20 

    Examines the achievements of the administration of former U.S. President Bill Clinton on economic policy and development in the country. Reputation of Clinton's administration and his team of economic policy-makers for a successful economic management; Deficit reduction; Investment improvements;...

  • WET-BLANKET BOOMLET. Kudlow, Lawrence // National Review;7/5/1993, Vol. 45 Issue 13, p37 

    The article argues that economic growth under U.S. President Bill Clinton from 1993-1994 can only be temporary, and can only result to stagflation from 1995-1996. An expected increase in income and business taxation and the high-spending fiscal plan of the administration will affect the economic...

Share

Read the Article

Other Topics