TITLE

It all started with a funeral wreath

PUB. DATE
March 1993
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;3/1/93, Vol. 114 Issue 8, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that Wang Dan and his deputy, Guo Haifeng, both organizers of `democracy salons' at Beijing University in April 1989, were granted early release from prison last week. Original prison sentence of four years; His involvement in the protest in Tiananmen Square; Reason for their early release.
ACCESSION #
9302250115

 

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