TITLE

What about the kids?

AUTHOR(S)
Fisher, Jennifer
PUB. DATE
January 1993
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;1/25/93, Vol. 114 Issue 3, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the marital situation of Princess Diana and Prince Charles. Allegations that Diana wants a speedier divorce; Charles' alleged adultery with Camilla Parker-Bowles; The question of who would get custody of the heirs to the throne may be superfluous; Mothers in England normally get child custody.
ACCESSION #
9301200788

 

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