TITLE

NOTEBOOK

PUB. DATE
March 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;3/24/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 11, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides news briefs concerning United Nations-led inspections in Iraq and United States political conditions in preparing for possible war. Belief of UN inspector Hans Blix that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein had more anthrax than has been declared, was lying when he declared that anthrax production stopped in 1990, and was lying again when he declared that weaponized anthrax was never deployed during the Gulf war; Example of Rwandan genocide during the 1990s by the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush in its arguments for why the UN Security Council should not be the final arbiter on war in Iraq; Reasons why Democratic congressional candidates' poll numbers began to plummet in competitive districts in 2002 once the party came to be defined as opposing the Bush on his views toward Iraq.
ACCESSION #
9298039

 

Related Articles

  • Blix-krieg. York, Byron // National Review;10/14/2002, Vol. 54 Issue 19, p30 

    The article argues that weapons inspections in Iraq is not worth doing, no matter who is in charge. Hans Blix, the United Nations arms-inspection chief who will search Iraq for weapons of mass destruction, has a history of not being terribly aggressive. Blix's critics point to the way he got his...

  • The Great DIVIDE. Dickey, Christopher; Hirsh, Michael; Barry, John; Wolffe, Richard; McGuire, Stryker; Nordland, Rod // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);2/24/2003 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 8, p12 

    Discusses the plight of many peace activists worldwide to protest the proposed war in Iraq. How there is tension between the U.S. and France; Consideration of the efforts of the United Nations Security Council to resolve the issue; How weapons inspector Hans Blix gave a presention about the...

  • The Great DIVIDE. Dickey, Christopher; Hirsh, Michael; Barry, John; Wolffe, Richard; McGuire, Stryker; Nordland, Rod // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);2/24/2003 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 8, p10 

    Discusses the plight of many peace activists worldwide to protest the proposed war in Iraq. How there is tension between the U.S. and France; Consideration of the efforts of the United Nations Security Council to resolve the issue; How weapons inspector Hans Blix gave a presention about the...

  • DOUBLE-STANDARD DEMOCRATS.  // American Enterprise;Dec2002, Vol. 13 Issue 8, p12 

    Discusses the double-standard of Democrat legislators in the U.S. on taking military action against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Proposal of Democrats on the need for a United Nations (U.N.) resolution to warrant a military action to oust...

  • For Saddam: unilateral assured destruction.  // Human Events;11/27/98, Vol. 54 Issue 45, p1 

    Reports on the standoff between the United States and Iraq concerning the issue of United Nations weapons inspection in Baghdad. Strategy adopted by the US to deter the Iraqi government from pursuing their biological and chemical weapons program; Reasons why the US is hesitant to bomb Iraq;...

  • Going with a Winner. Pryce-Jones, David // National Review;10/14/2002, Vol. 54 Issue 19, p20 

    The article analyzes the stances taken by the U.S. and the United Nations (UN) on whether or not to invade Iraq. The U.S. wants a regime change in Iraq, where as the UN is opposed to this idea. It is unthinkable that a proven killer like Iraq President Saddam Hussein should be able to deploy...

  • A Great Divide. Dickey, Christopher; Hirsh, Michael; Barry, John; Wolffe, Richard; McGuire, Stryker; Nordland, Rod // Newsweek;2/24/2003, Vol. 141 Issue 8, p34 

    States that Europe and the United States are largely split over whether a war to change the regime in Iraq is justified and contends that the divisions stem from differing perceptions of history and politics, power and God. Chief weapons inspector Hans Blix's report to the United Nations...

  • Truth Be Told. Beinart, Peter // New Republic;3/24/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 11, p6 

    Why does so much of the world think the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush has hidden, nefarious motives for its war in Iraq? Partly, it's because Marxism isn't entirely dead--and many people still assume that U.S. foreign policy is governed by a rapacious, imperialistic desire for...

  • Saddam's Next Steps. Nordland, Rod // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);11/25/2002 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 140 Issue 22, p2 

    When it comes to Iraq and United Nations Security Council resolutions, nothing is ever quite what it seems. Saddam Hussein pretended to be furious last week, but just before the deadline to accept the resolution on weapons inspections, he did accept it. U.N. inspectors were headed back into Iraq...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics