TITLE

Let's talk politics (or not): Regulating political expression at work

PUB. DATE
September 2012
SOURCE
HR Specialist: Pennsylvania Employment Law;Sep2012, Vol. 7 Issue 9, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the regulation of the employees' political expression at work. It mentions that free speech is not protected by First Amendment in a private-sector workplace. It presents guidelines on drafting a policy that minimizes distractions and permits reasonable free speech which include setting a business reason for restrictions, providing guidelines, and avoiding to retaliate against off-duty political activity.
ACCESSION #
92972151

 

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