TITLE

HOW EDUCATIONAL DESIGN CAN RESPOND TO THE IMPACT OF GENDER IN AUSTRALIA

AUTHOR(S)
Crilly, Karen
PUB. DATE
August 2013
SOURCE
Redress;Aug2013, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article looks at gender stereotypes in education design and education curriculum in Australia including students' attitudes and pedagogical responses. Special attention is paid to the construction and deconstruction of the notions of masculinity and femininity in society and in the classroom, as well as the role of the teacher in improving students' confidence in performing gendered tasks.
ACCESSION #
92945479

 

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