TITLE

Smokescreens and mirrors

AUTHOR(S)
Lewis, Elen
PUB. DATE
February 2003
SOURCE
Brand Strategy;Feb2003, Issue 168, p24
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the corporate social responsibility of the tobacco companies in Great Britain. Consistency of support to health message about smoking; Placement of health warnings on the packaging and advertising; Contribution of the companies to youth prevention initiatives. INSET: Key learnings.
ACCESSION #
9293259

 

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