TITLE

State of the union

AUTHOR(S)
Roberts, Steven V.
PUB. DATE
December 1992
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;12/28/92-1/4/93, Vol. 113 Issue 25, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses United States President-elect Bill Clinton's upcoming State of the Union address. Change as the pivotal force of 1992; Clinton' biggest challenge; The key themes of diversity and accountability; How the two themes come together; The face rapidly changing face of America's legislature; The diverse forces driving change; Change will result from already-approved laws; Not all change is good.
ACCESSION #
9212283864

 

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