TITLE

Rap music's toxic fringe

AUTHOR(S)
Leo, J.
PUB. DATE
June 1992
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;6/29/92, Vol. 112 Issue 25, p19
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Addresses the question of whether it was appropriate or not for rap singer Sister Souljah to be on the program at the Washington convention of Jesse Jackson's Rainbow Coalition. The high anger level, with heavy emphasis on black militarism and race war; Her controversial lyrics; Rapper Ice-T's current album against cops.
ACCESSION #
9206291107

 

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