TITLE

Buggy banquet

AUTHOR(S)
Hawkins, D.; Tooley, J.A.
PUB. DATE
June 1992
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;6/1/92, Vol. 112 Issue 21, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Celebrates the New York Entomological Society's 100th anniversary during the week of May 18, 1992 with a swank Upper East Side dinner party featuring insect cuisine. Recipes for honey-pot ants, giant Thai water bugs sauteed in olive oil and chocolate cricket torte; The role insects play in the diets of other cultures; Guest speaker Gene Defoliart, publisher of the `Food Insects' newsletter; More.
ACCESSION #
9206013405

 

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