TITLE

Most biodegradable plastics are `a con.'

AUTHOR(S)
Coghlan, A.
PUB. DATE
February 1992
SOURCE
New Scientist;2/8/92, Vol. 133 Issue 1807, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reveals results from a study at Cornell University which found most plastics that are claimed to be biodegradable are not really biodegradable at all. How the study was conducted; In most cases the only component in the plastic that biodegrades is the starch filler; Name of the plastic that was totally biodegradable.
ACCESSION #
9203161514

 

Related Articles

  • Dissolving the plastics problem Holton, Conard // Environmental Health Perspectives;Apr1997, Vol. 105 Issue 4, p388 

    No abstract available.

  • NRC, SPI, & chasing arrows: is there common ground? Rabasca, Lisa // Waste Age;Dec1994, Vol. 25 Issue 12, p46 

    No abstract available.

  • The plastics challenge. Scott, G. // Current Health 2;Nov91, Vol. 18 Issue 3, p24 

    Discusses the recycling of plastics. How plastics are made from polymers in a process called polymerization; Plastics' inability to break down in the environment; How recycling works; How new plastics called composites are made; Composites made from polycarbonate; Environmentally sound uses of...

  • Nonprofit venture creates needed jobs Voegele, Albin G. // In Business;Jan/Feb1992, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p52 

    No abstract available.

  • Recycling peanuts.  // Machine Design;2/6/97, Vol. 69 Issue 3, p138 

    Reports on Plastic Loose Fill Council's establishment of the Peanut Hotline, a national round-the-clock hotline providing callers with names of local businesses in need of plastic peanuts for their own shipping needs. Annual manufacture and sales of loose-fill in the United States.

  • Plastics-a-go-go. Gutin, J. // Mother Jones;Mar/Apr92, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p56 

    Examines what's wrong with the idea of recycling plastics. The `Oui-Oui-Screen' as a metaphor; Move by environmentalists to ban plastic altogether; Consumers caught in the middle; The two classes of plastics; Pointlessness of recycling plastic.

  • How to sow cress and reap plastic. Coghlan, A. // New Scientist;5/9/92, Vol. 134 Issue 1820, p20 

    Reports how researchers in the United States who have overcome a valuable first step toward producing plants that contain plastic. They have genetically modified thale cress to produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB); Potential problem; They envision plastics production in huge plantations.

  • Plasticizers.  // Plastics Technology;Aug96 Supplement Handbook, Vol. 42 Issue 8, p415 

    Features plasticizers. Includes TGD plasticizer for urethanes; Flexricin ricinoleate-based plasticizers; Uresin B carbamate resin.

  • Wash-away plastics. Ashley, S. // Popular Science;Jun87, Vol. 230 Issue 6, p45 

    A Swiss polymer-processing firm has developed innovative plastic materials that remain water-resistant during use, but then dissolve away into nontoxic residues after disposal. Discusses the many kinds of possible applications of the thermoplastic materials.

  • Presto! `Growing' parts from liquid plastic. Brown, S.F. // Popular Science;May89, Vol. 234 Issue 5, p130 

    Reports on a new process called Stereolithography which uses a computer-guided laser to `grow' 3-D prototype parts from photosensitive liquid plastic. Quicker and cheaper than traditional model-making methods, it's helping manufacturers hurry new products to market. INSET: But will the nurses...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics