TITLE

Something nasty in the potting shed

AUTHOR(S)
Anderson, I.
PUB. DATE
February 1992
SOURCE
New Scientist;2/8/92, Vol. 133 Issue 1807, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on a legionella bacterium that has been found in potting soil in Australia and has caused the deaths of two men. Warning labels will appear on packages; Results of a study within the industry on the legionella species; Suggestion for making soil safer.
ACCESSION #
9203161478

 

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