TITLE

The air sacs and the tennis court

AUTHOR(S)
Williams, M.
PUB. DATE
January 1992
SOURCE
New Scientist;1/18/92, Vol. 133 Issue 1804, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on major misconceptions that have been made in scientific literature throughout history. Belief in spontaneous generation; Animal wombs were thought to be sensitive to aromatic smells; Number of alveoli in the lungs.
ACCESSION #
9202170161

 

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