TITLE

Six-bonded silicon surprises the chemists

AUTHOR(S)
Emsley, J.
PUB. DATE
January 1992
SOURCE
New Scientist;1/18/92, Vol. 133 Issue 1804, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that chemists in the United States have discovered a cheap and easy way of making silicon compounds in which the silicon is bonded to five or six oxygen atoms. What the new materials are used for; How chemists currently break through silica's barrier of chemical inactivity; What chemists use to achieve this new material.
ACCESSION #
9202170140

 

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