TITLE

Cutting up the military

AUTHOR(S)
Collins, S.
PUB. DATE
February 1992
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;2/10/92, Vol. 112 Issue 5, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the ways in which President George Bush's defense budget will leave millions of American workers jobless. Bush's proposal of slashing another $50 billion in defense spending over the next five years; How his proposal is expected to work; The misery could multiply if the Pentagon's budget is trimmed further; Fight over the peace dividend; Defense budget alternatives; Ways to lessen the pain; Measures some companies have attempted to adjust.
ACCESSION #
9202104433

 

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