TITLE

Genetic weeding and feeding for tobacco plants

AUTHOR(S)
Bradley, D.
PUB. DATE
January 1992
SOURCE
New Scientist;1/4/92, Vol. 133 Issue 1802, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on a technique developed by biochemists at the Ludwig Maximillan University in Munich, Germany that have found a way of protecting tobacco crops from weeds while providing them with nitrogen. They have genetically engineered the plants to produce an enzyme to convert the common weed killer cyanamide into urea.
ACCESSION #
9202031417

 

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