TITLE

Biosorption of toxic congo red dye from aqueous solution by eco-friendly biosorbent Saccharum bengalense: kinetics and thermodynamics

AUTHOR(S)
Din, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Zaib; Mirza, Muhammad Latif; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof; Madni, Asadullah; Ahmad, Saeed
PUB. DATE
August 2013
SOURCE
Desalination & Water Treatment;Aug2013, Vol. 51 Issue 28-30, p5638
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In the present study, Saccharum bengalense (SB), a potential biosorbent, was investigated for the removal of toxic Congo red (CR) dye. The effect of various operating variables, viz. adsorbent dosage, pH, contact time, and temperature on the removal of dye has been studied. Almost 94% removal of dye is possible after 50 min at pH 2.0 under batch test conditions. It was found that a pseudo-second-order mechanism was predominant and the overall rate of the dye adsorption process appears to be controlled by more than one step. The intraparticle diffusion model was applied to investigate the rate determining step. Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm. The biosorption data were better represented by the Langmuir model and the biosorption capacity (qmax) of SB for CR was achieved at 125 mg/g. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°), and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were calculated and revealed the spontaneous, endothermic, and feasible nature of the adsorption process. Biomass derived from the pulp of SB was evaluated as an effective biosorbent for removal of CR dye.
ACCESSION #
92015465

 

Related Articles

  • REMOVAL OF CONGO RED AND METHYLENE BLUE BY USING LOW COST ADSORBENT. BAITOD, JAYSHREE; UPADHYAY, KANJAN; SRIVASTAVA, J. K. // Journal of Industrial Pollution Control;2015, Vol. 31 Issue 1, p17 

    Waste water generated from dyeing unit is highly coloured and exerts high BOD, COD, turbidity, etc. Low cost adsorbent for the treatment of waste water can make the treatment process more economical, variation in the pollution load make the treatment more difficult since most of the dyeing units...

  • Rubber seeds ( Hevea brasiliensis ): an adsorbent for adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution. Zulfikar, Muhammad Ali; Setiyanto, Henry; Rusnadi; Solakhudin, Lanang // Desalination & Water Treatment;Dec2015, Vol. 56 Issue 11, p2976 

    This study aims to investigate the use of rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) seeds, a solid agricultural waste, as a novel adsorbent for the adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution in batch mode. Experiments were carried out as a function of contact time, dye concentration, adsorbent dosage,...

  • Removal of Congo red and Methyl violet dyes from waste water by Adsorption on Low-cost Material. Adinew, Bizuneh; Kebede, Tesfahun; Shimelis, Benebru // Asian Journal of Research in Chemistry;Jul2011, Vol. 4 Issue 7, p1148 

    The adsorption of Methyl violet and Congo red from aqueous solution onto untreated and hexadecyltrimethylammonumbromide (HTAB) treated adsorbent and have been studied using an agitated batch adsorber. The influences of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, and adsorbent mass have been...

  • Utilization of the agricultural waste ( Cicer arientinum Linn fruit shell biomass) as biosorbent for decolorization of Congo red. Sivarama Krishna, L.; Sreenath Reddy, A.; Muralikrishna, A.; Wan Zuhairi, W.Y.; Osman, Hasnah; Varada Reddy, A. // Desalination & Water Treatment;Nov2015, Vol. 56 Issue 8, p2181 

    Investigations have been carried out to study the use of Bengal gram fruit shell (SP) as a low-cost, eco-friendly biosorbent for the removal of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and SEM were used to carry out characteristic studies on the material...

  • Comparison study on the adsorption performance of methylene blue and congo red on Cu-BTC. Hu, Jue; Dai, Wei; Yan, Xiaoyang // Desalination & Water Treatment;Feb2016, Vol. 57 Issue 9, p4081 

    Cu-BTC, one of the metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), has been applied to remove the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and anionic dye methyl orange (CR) from contaminated water. Liquid phase adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorptive capacity was determined. Various...

  • Cellulose Nanofibril/Carbon Nanomaterial Hybrid Aerogels for Adsorption Removal of Cationic and Anionic Organic Dyes. Yu, Zhencheng; Hu, Chuanshuang; Dichiara, Anthony B.; Jiang, Weihui; Gu, Jin // Nanomaterials (2079-4991);Jan2020, Vol. 10 Issue 1, p169 

    Advances in nanoscale science and engineering are providing new opportunities to develop promising adsorbents for environmental remediation. Here, hybrid aerogels are assembled from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and carbon nanomaterials to remove cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and anionic dye...

  • Adsorption of Congo Red Dye from Aqueous Solutions by Wheat husk. Sabah, Israa; Alwared, Abeer I. // Journal of Engineering (17264073);Dec2019, Vol. 25 Issue 12, p72 

    The Wheat husk is one of the common wastes abundantly available in the Middle East countries especially in Iraq. The present study aimed to evaluate the Wheat husk as low cost material, eco-friendly adsorbents for the removal of the carcinogenic dye (Congo red dye) from wastewater by investigate...

  • Single-crystalline porous NiO nanobiscuits with prompt adsorption activity for Congo red. Hanmei Hu; Man Wang; Han Xuan; Kehua Zhang; Juanjuan Xu // Micro & Nano Letters;2017, Vol. 12 Issue 12, p987 

    Single-crystalline two-dimensional (2D) nickel oxide (NiO) porous nanobiscuits with diameters of 100–210 nm, thicknesses of 10–20 nm and pore sizes of <20 nm are fabricated through a low-cost water bath combined with calcination treatment approach. The composition and morphology of...

  • Kinetic and Thermodynamic Adsorption Studies of Congo Red On Bentonite. Taher, Tarmizi; Mohadi, Risfidian; Rohendi, Dedi; Lesbani, Aldes // AIP Conference Proceedings;2017, Vol. 1823 Issue 1, p1 

    Adsorption of congo red on bentonite was studied kinetics and thermodynamically. Bentonite was physically activated at various temperatures and characterized using X-ray, and infrared. By increasing thermal temperature activation up to 500 °C can decrease the montmorillonite fraction with...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics